St. Augustine Grass – Southern Roots

Whether you're building a new lawn or improving an existing one, St. Augustine grass, in the right climate, is strong and can produce a beautiful, thick, dark-green lawn.
Whether you're building a new lawn or improving an existing one, St. Augustine grass, in the right climate, is strong and can produce a beautiful, thick, dark-green lawn.

St. Augustine grass thrives in Southern soil, withstanding high temperatures and saltwater from the ocean

Coarse in texture and dark green in color, St. Augustine grass is a popular type of grass that grows from the Carolinas to Florida, and along the Gulf Coast to Texas and even California. St. Augustine grass is similar to bermuda grass and can survive in sunny, tropical areas; consequently, this type of grass is extremely vulnerable to cooler temperatures. Because there are no seeds, St. Augustine grass is typically planted as sprigs, plugs or sod.

St. Augustine Grass Care

Is your lawn covered in St. Augustine grass but you're unsure of how to care for and maintain it? For starters, St. Augustine grass likes to be fed. If given the appropriate amount of fertilizer, this type of grass will produce an aesthetically stunning appearance, as well as resist weed growth. For the grass to change green rapidly, apply a fertilizer that's made up of fast-release nitrogen (apply using a fertilizer spreader).

When you mow your St. Augustine grass, don't mow too closely. Why? If the grass is too short, St. Augustine grass can become weakened and prone to weeds. If you live in an area where there is a shortage of rainfall, don't cut the grass altogether, as this can add additional stress.

If you're considering planting St. Augustine grass, the best time to do so is during the spring or early months of summer. During the beginning growth stage, you should water your St. Augustine grass frequently throughout the day and in short periods.

St. Augustine Grass Insects & Pests

The chinch bug and the St. Augustine Decline (SAD) virus both pose threats to St. Augustine grass. By noshing on the stems at the leaf sheath base, the chinch bug causes harm to St. Augustine grass. The SAD virus can be transmitted from mowing equipment; once a lawn with St. Augustine grass has been infected with the virus, the grass becomes weaker and is oftentimes overcome with bermuda grass or weeds. Symptoms include grass that's stunted and random spots of dead grass throughout the lawn. Although symptoms remain, the SAD virus can be treated with fertilization and responds well to iron in the summertime.

 
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